Sexual Violence

Sexual Violence

Consent is Mandatory

The Consent is Mandatory campaign seeks to address rape culture on campus. Rape culture is a societal system which historically and presently blames victims and survivors of sexual violence, while normalising the actions of perpetrators. The Consent is Mandatory campaign wants to start building a culture of consent on campus that normalises processes of seeking consent and putting survivors first.

What Is Consent?

Consent means that all parties involved within a situation, be it sexual or not, must be in agreement with whatever is done to them, with them or around them, and should not be coerced or taken advantage of. Consent is about adhering to the belief that everyone should have ownership over their own bodies, their personal spaces, and their right to make their own decisions.

Consent is necessary for any sexual act. Sexual acts are not limited to sexual intercourse and include (but are not limited to) touching another person and/or sexual comments.

Always ask first! Consent is when one person agrees to or gives permission to another person to do something. The way a person dresses, talks, or dances does not determine if consent is present. If a person consents to any sexual act, they still have the right to change their mind at any time during sexual activity. If consent is not present; sexual assault is.

No Means No Campaign

The Canadian Federation of Students developed the “No Means No” campaign more than twenty years ago to raise awareness and reduce the occurrence of sexual assault, acquaintance rape, and dating violence. The “No Means No” campaign offers various resources, including research on the incidences of sexual violence in Canada, buttons, stickers, posters and postcards.

Visit the webpage at: http://cfs-fcee.ca/issues/no-means-no/

Ryerson Sexual Violence Policy

The Centre for Women & Trans People participates in a number of steering committees for the Ryerson Sexual Violence Policy and the Office of Sexual Violence Support & Education. The Centre has been one of the primary advocates for getting the university to implement a campus-wide policy and will often host discussions, consultations and opportunities to engage with students and decision-makers in improving the policy.

View the Ryerson Sexual Violence Policy at: http://www.ryerson.ca/policies/board/sexualviolencepolicy/

Office of Sexual Violence Support & Education: Visit the webpage at: http://www.ryerson.ca/sexualviolence